Big Easy® Holiday Beef Shank

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The holidays are here and soon turkeys, hams, and rib roasts will be adorning tables across the country. Those are classic holiday meals, tried and true. However, if you are like me, sometimes you have the itch to shake things up a bit.

Roasting a whole beef shank is a fun way to take the holiday meal in a different direction.  It creates a stunning impression when your dinner guests see you carrying this hunk of meat in on a gargantuan bone. The meat is similar to brisket or beef short ribs – tender and luscious. The flavor is unique from those two, the taste of beef shank has an edginess that I like.

This is a beef shank that we made Thanksgiving weekend when we were busy with holiday decorating.  That’s the great thing about this recipe, I used the Char-Broil® Big Easy® Oil-less Turkey Fryer.  After prepping the roast and dropping it in the Big Easy®, I could ignore it for 8 hours while I went about trying to figure out why the Christmas tree has lights out on one side.

Beef Shank

Power braised in the Big Easy®, this whole beef shank is simple, but rich in flavor, and is welcome comfort food on any holiday table.

Big Easy® Beef Shank

Ingredients

  • 8-10 pound beef shank
  • 1/2 cup beef broth
  • ¼ cup coarse grain mustard
  • For the rub
  • 3 tablespoon coarse ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoon chili powder
  • 2 tablespoon dried oregano
  • For the braising liquid
  • 1 3/4 cup stock
  • 3 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • Equipment needed
  • Two 18” x 36” pieces aluminum foil
  • 8” pie pan

Instructions

  1. Preheat the Big Easy® Oil-Less Turkey Fryer to medium heat.
  2. Prepare the beef shank. Trim off the fat cap and silverskin. Use a meat syringe to inject the beef broth into the muscles.
  3. Season the beef. Slather the coarse grain mustard all over the beef. Mix the rub ingredients together and season the beef on all sides.
  4. Wrap the beef. Place the two pieces of foil on a table forming an “x” and place the 8” pie pan in the center of it. Mix together the braising liquid and add 1 cup to the pan. Place the beef shank upright with the fatter end down in the pan. Pull up the foil and tightly seal around the shank. Place this into the Big Easy® basket, taking care not to tear the foil. You need to keep the liquid in the pack for it to braise.
  5. Place the basket into the Big Easy® and cook at medium (300-325f target) for 4 hours.
  6. Remove the basket, carefully pull the foil back and pour the remaining cup of braising liquid so it runs down the leg into pie pan. Seal back up and cook until the roast reaches an internal temperature of 195°f, about a total cook time of 8 hours
  7. Carefully remove the roast from the foil, reserving the liquid. Place the roast back in the Big Easy® for 10-15 minutes to crisp the outer crust.
  8. Pour the liquid into a grease separator. Strain off the jus (leaving the grease in the separator) and taste for seasoning, adjusting with salt and pepper if desired.
  9. Remove the roast from the Big Easy® and let rest for 10 minutes. Use two large forks to shred the meat.
  10. We like to serve the shredded beef on mashed potatoes or stone ground grits and topped with the beef jus.
http://www.charbroil.com/community/big-easy-holiday-beef-shank/
beef shank silver skin
If your butcher has not already done so, use a very sharp boning knife to remove the fat cap and silverskin. Pull up on the cap (top half of the picture) and use small strokes with the tip of the knife to peel it back like this. Then slide the knife under the silverskin (shown in the bottom half of the picture) and slice it off.
trimmed beef shank
Trimmed and ready to season. The trimming gets rid of the tough silverskin which will not render away. It also exposes the red beef to accept seasoning and to form a crust when cooking.
Seasoned beef shank
It may seem like a lot of seasoning but you really have to “lay it on” big roasts like this, prime rib, or brisket.
wrapped beef shank
Please excuse the blurry picture but it was hard doing this and trying to take a picture at the same time. Even though you won’t be taking pictures, it’s a good idea to have two sets of hands for this part. One to hold the roast upright in place and the other to handle pouring the liquid and sealing the foil. You MIGHT be able to do this without an 8” pie pan but it is important to keep the bottom of the foil pack from tearing and losing all of the luscious liquid.
foiled beef shank
I was worried that this huge beef shank wouldn’t fit in the Big Easy® but it fit perfectly.
checking temperature for beef shank
I wanted to keep the temperature in the 300-325°f range so I used an air temp thermometer in the Big Easy®. You really don’t need this and can just leave it on medium heat. I’m just a data guy.
Big Easy Oil-Less Turkey Fryer
Keeping the Big Easy control knob at half way like this kept the cooker temps where I wanted them.
cooked beef shank in Big Easy
Taking a peak about 4 hours in. Looks can be deceiving, this roast was only at an internal temperature of 133°f at this point but it looked ready to eat!
cooked beef shank ready to prepare
Shank removed from the foil. Honestly, you could eat it just like this. I just like to get the crust a little crustier, like brisket or beef ribs to get that “black gold” outside.
beef shank ready to eat
You can see that the shank has drawn up by over half way. That’s because it has broken down all the collagen and concentrated the beef. The beef jus is amazing on mashed potatoes.
Delicious Beef Shank
Despite how dark the crust is, the inside is juicy, rich, and luscious.

A beef shank of this size will serve about 8 people but don’t worry if you have a smaller crowd. This beef rocks for leftovers.  It’s amazing on sliders, in tacos, or stuffed into a loaded baked potato.  The Big Easy® lived up to its name in that it was easy, but it is way more than just a turkey fryer!

Truffle and Herb Pork Loin Roast with Marmalade Glaze

Pork loins are excellent for roasts because they are relatively inexpensive and they can take on just about any flavor profile.  They are also lean and almost perfectly cylindrical, which makes pork loins ideal for spit roasting, so I did this roast on my Gas2Coal hybrid grill with the Char-Broil Universal Rotisserie installed.  This rotisserie roasted pork loin was basted with truffle and herb compound butter and then brushed with a marmalade glaze to enhance the pork’s natural sweetness.

truffle-and-herb-pork-loin-roast-square-dsc_8340

Truffle and Herb Pork Loin Roast with Marmalade Glaze

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 lb pork loin roast
  • Compound butter
  • 1 stick unsalted butter, softened
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh rosemary
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh sage
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried parsley
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ - ½ teaspoon truffle oilMarmalade glaze
  • 1/2 cup cranberry orange marmalade 
  • 1/4 cup stock
  • 1 tablespoon orange liqueur [optional]

Instructions

  1. Make the compound butter. Soften the butter by leaving it at room temperature for an hour. Mix together with the thyme, rosemary, sage, parsley, pepper, kosher salt, and ¼ teaspoon of white truffle oil. Taste and add more oil if you desire.
  2. Prepare the pork loin. Either remove the pork loin fat cap or score it with a very sharp knife (see notes). Tie the roast if desired. Slather the roast with the compound butter. Spear the pork loin onto a rotisserie rod.
  3. Preheat the grill to medium high with the coals or heat elements close but not directly underneath where the rotisserie will be.
  4. Place the rotisserie rod in place on the grill and let cook until it reaches an internal temperature of 125°f, about 45 minutes to 1 hour. Replenish coals as necessary to maintain heat.
  5. Meanwhile, place the glaze ingredients in a small pot on the side burner on low heat. Simmer until reduced, about 5 minutes.
  6. Once the roast hits an internal temperature of 125°f, brush the glaze onto the pork roast and let finish cooking until the roast hits an internal temperature of 145°f (another 15-20 minutes).
  7. Let the roast rest for 5 minutes and then slice.
http://www.charbroil.com/community/truffle-herb-pork-loin-roast-marmalade-glaze/
truffle oil for pork loin roast
Truffle oil can be strong so start out light at 1/4 teaspoon and then build from there, tasting as you add small amounts.
wrapped pork loin roast
Notice the score marks (the diagonal slash marks) on the fat cap. You do this by lightly drawing a sharp knife across the surface. This lets the seasonings get in a little deeper and it will provide a textured crust after roasting. I tied mine with butcher string because it helps keep a uniform shape and it makes it hold better on a rotisserie rod.
buttered pork loin roast
The butter doesn’t have to be perfect, just get it smeared on there. It melts shortly into the cook anyway and then starts basting the meat as it spins.
Gas2Coal
I used the gas assist feature of the Gas2Coal. Once the coals are lit, then you can move them into place like below.
pork loin roast in Gas2Coal
Overhead view of my rotisserie set up. The unique charcoal tray of the Gas2Coal dual fuel grill is great for rotisserie. Not only does it pretty much eliminate flare ups from the dripping butter, it also acts as a big heat reflector, making sure that all of the heat is directed back up at the meat. All those drippings below will burn off easily the next time I start the grill up. [FTC Disclaimer – I received my Gas2Coal as part of my compensation package.]
herbed and seasoned pork loin roast
The herbs and seasonings stay behind after the butter finally bastes away.
marmalade for pork loin roast
I used a cranberry orange marmalade but you can use just orange marmalade. Remember that gas grill side burners have to contend with wind and tend to run hotter than indoor burners, so set it low and keep an eye on it.
pork loin roast cooking over lamb charcoal
I like to use Char-Broil Center Cut Lump Charcoal to refuel my fire because it lights easily and puts off a cleaner smoke when it first starts up. Briquettes can smolder a rough smelling smoke when they first light up.
truffle and herb pork loin roast
A rotisserie roasted pork loin with roasted carrots and potatoes makes for a meal worthy of a special occasion or special guests.
The USDA changing the required internal temperature for pork roasts from 165°f to 145°f with a three-minute rest several years ago and it makes a world of difference in the result. Tender and juicy as can be.
The USDA changing the required internal temperature for pork roasts from 165°f to 145°f with a three-minute rest several years ago and it makes a world of difference in the result. Tender and juicy as can be.

How To Cook A Steak On A Gas Grill

I think that title is a bit misleading, because I can cook a steak on a gas grill using any of the same techniques that I use for charcoal grills – direct, sear/roast, reverse sear, or even sous vide. In fact, the only method that I can think of that you can do on a charcoal grill but not a gas grill would be the caveman technique, where you put the steak directly onto the live coals. Thanks to advanced grilling technology like the TRU-Infrared system on my Char-Broil Professional gas grill, today’s gas grills aren’t as much different from charcoal grills as they used to be. So, a more appropriate title is “One Way How To Cook A Steak On A Gas Grill” and the method I am using is called the “hot tub” method.

I learned about the “hot tub” method many years ago in an online BBQ forum full of hardcore grillers and smoking enthusiasts. Story goes, someone put steaks in a zip top bag and dropped it in a hot tub before grilling it. Food safety aside, the technique works as sort of a redneck version of the French method of sous vide cooking, just without the expensive equipment. The warm water bath gently raises the temperature of the entire steak evenly to almost being done and then you sear the heck out of the steak.

Honestly there isn’t much of an advantage to doing it this way. It does give you an extra tender, juicy, and evenly cooked steak but an accomplished grill master can get the same results using the other techniques too. But the technique absolutely works and it is fun to do for something different.

Of course, I use a pot of hot water on my grill’s side burner instead of a yucky bacteria infested or over-chlorinated hot tub. Today, I did the hot tub steaks using my shallot steak seasoning but you can use whatever steak seasoning you wish, even just salt, pepper and garlic.

Steak on Gas Grill

Hot Tubbed Ribeye Steaks with Portobello Mushroom Sauce

Yield: 2 steaks

Ingredients

  • 2 boneless ribeye steaks, at least 1” thick
  • 2 tablespoons steak seasoning
  • For the Portobello Mushroom Sauce
  • 4 cups sliced baby bella mushrooms
  • 2 tablespoon coarse chopped garlic
  • 1 shallot peeled and sliced
  • 2 tablespoons butter cut into pieces
  • ¼ cup red wine
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 cup green onion for garnish
  • You’ll need
  • 2 gallon zip top bags
  • 18” x 24” piece of aluminum foil

Instructions

  1. Put a large pot of water on your grill side burner and heat it to 125°f to 130°f.
  2. Season your steaks with most of your steak seasoning, reserving about a teaspoon or so for later. Place each steak in a zip top bag and press as much air out of the bag as possible, then seal it. You want the warm water touching the steaks, not air.
  3. Place the steaks in the warm water for 1 hour. Stir occasionally (about every 15 minutes) to circulate the water. Turn the burner back on as needed to keep the heat between 115° and 125°f.
  4. After the water has been on for 30 minutes, turn one half of the grill on high heat and the other side on medium heat.
  5. Meanwhile fold the foil in half so you have an 18” x 12” double piece of foil. Put the mushrooms, shallot, garlic, butter, salt and pepper on it. Fold it in half again, covering the veggies, and seal up the two edges to form an envelope (see pics). Add the wine and Worcestershire sauce and then seal the last open side.
  6. After the water has been on for 40 minutes, place the foil pack on the medium side of the grill and shut the grill lid.
  7. After the steak has been in the hot water for 60 minutes, remove them from the zip bags and pat the steaks dry. Discard the bags and water. Re-season the steaks with the 1 teaspoon of reserved seasoning.
  8. Place the steaks on the hot side of the grill, you almost can’t get it too hot for this part. Grill the steaks for 45 seconds and give them a quarter turn. Grill them for another 45 seconds and then flip the steaks.
  9. Grill for 45 seconds on this side and then give them a quarter turn, letting them cook another 45 seconds (so that’s a total of 90 seconds per side).
  10. Temp check your steak, it should be about 127-130°f and it will coast up to a perfect medium rare. Remove the steak and mushrooms from the grill.
  11. Let the steaks rest on a raised rack for 5 minutes while you CAREFULLY open the foil pack. Use forks or steam proof gloves to open the foil pack. Toss the contents with their sauce and serve with the steaks.
http://www.charbroil.com/community/cook-steak-gas-grill/
Steak on Gas Grill being prepared
This technique requires at least 1” thick steaks, don’t scrimp on thinner ones.
seasoned steak on gas grill
Don’t forget to season the sides, you want them to taste good too, don’t you?
steak on gas grill being prepped
Press all of the air out of the bag. Too much air and the steaks will float, you want them down in the water making full contact with warm water.
Char-Broil Professional Gas Grill
I used my Char-Broil Professional grill for this cook. Of my 17 grills, this one is one of my favorites because of its TRU-Infrared heat, stylish looks, cast iron grates, and the big stainless steel work area.
It is important that you keep track of your water temperature.  This was a warm day so it was easy keeping the temp up, I only had to cut the burner on once for about a minute.  If you do have to turn the burner on, watch out for the ends of the bags if they are hanging over the pot edge.
It is important that you keep track of your water temperature. This was a warm day so it was easy keeping the temp up, I only had to cut the burner on once for about a minute. If you do have to turn the burner on, watch out for the ends of the bags if they are hanging over the pot edge.
ingredients for steak on gas grill
I like the extra wide work surfaces that the Professional grill has, it makes things easier.
covered steak on gas grill
Remind anyone of hobo packs and Boy/Girl Scout meals? The liquids in the foil pack will braise everything gently making it hard to overcook this even if you leave it on longer by accident.
steak on gas grill being wrapped
Seal up 2 of the sides like this before adding the liquid, so you have a container into which you can pour the liquids.
The occasional stirring is needed to make sure the water closest to the steaks hasn't cooled off.  The sous vide equipment often includes a water circulator.  Notice I’m still keeping tabs on the water temperature.
The occasional stirring is needed to make sure the water closest to the steaks hasn’t cooled off. The sous vide equipment often includes a water circulator. Notice I’m still keeping tabs on the water temperature.
prepped steak on gas grill
The steaks won’t be very wet unless your bag has a slight leak but I still like to pat them dry. Wet meat makes it harder to get nice grill marks.
thermometer checking steak on gas grill
I like to temp check the steaks as soon as they come out of the “hot tub” to see where they are. They should be close to what your water temperature averaged. The Char-Broil Digital Instant Thermometer gives you quick, accurate readings.
seasoning steak on gas grill
Freshen up the seasoning with the teaspoon of steak seasoning that you reserved at the beginning.
Charcoal grills do add more flavor than gas so I like to put some wood chips on about 5 minutes before the steak goes down. Today I was using Char-Broil’s Simple Smokes and just sprinkled the chips onto the infrared emitter.
steak on gas grill ready
As you can see, the Simple Smoke chips put off enough smoke to ensure that “fresh off the grill” flavor.
ready to eat steak on gas grill
Pro Tip: Rest your steaks on a raised rack. Putting them on a flat surface causes that side of the steak to steam and release juices.
Grilled ribeye steaks, mushroom sauce, creamed spinach, rolls, and a salad - who needs a steak house when I have a Char-Broil?
Grilled ribeye steaks, mushroom sauce, creamed spinach, rolls, and a salad – who needs a steak house when I have a Char-Broil?
Evenly cooked medium rare all the way through.
Evenly cooked medium rare all the way through.

So if you want to try something different with your steaks on the gas grill – give the old hot tub method a spin!   

Bourbon and Black Pepper Prime Rib

The holiday prime rib is a celebration of all that is good about beef and it doesn’t need much other than a grill, salt, pepper, and garlic.  But sometimes it is good to enhance the flavor with a little something special like the oaky smokiness of bourbon.  That’s what I did with this rib roast – I used a bourbon and black pepper baste to complement the beef and build layers of flavor on top of the beef rub base.

Black Pepper and Bourbon Prime Rib

Bourbon and Black Pepper Prime Rib

Ingredients

  • 5 pound bone in beef rib roast
  • ¼ cup beef rub
  • For the Baste
  • 1 tablespoon tallow or oil
  • ½ cup diced sweet onion
  • 4 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
  • ½ cup bourbon
  • 2 tablespoons coarse black pepper
  • ½ tablespoon smoked paprika
  • 2 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 cup beef stock

Instructions

  1. Preheat your smoker to 275°f. For the Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker, this was as simple as putting water in the water pan, putting oak wood chips in the smoker box, and then starting the preheat cycle.
  2. In a small stock pot over medium heat, sauté the onions for 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook 2-3 more minutes.
  3. Add the bourbon (it’s best to do this with the pot away from open flame) and simmer until reduced by half, about 5 minutes.
  4. Stir in the pepper, paprika, stock, soy sauce, and Worcestershire sauce. Bring to a simmer for 2-3 minutes and then let rest. If you want less texture, you can strain the baste before using. I use it with the coarse ingredients still in there.
  5. Season the beef all over with the beef rub.
  6. Place the rib roast in the smoker and let it slow roast.
  7. After 2 hours, baste the rib roast with the bourbon baste and let it keep smoking. Baste it again at 3 hours with the rest of the baste and let it continue cooking.
  8. For rare, pulled the roast at an internal temperature of 125°f – about 4 hours.
  9. For medium rare, pull the roast at an internal temperature of 130°f – or about 4 ½ hours.
  10. For medium, pull the roast at an internal temperature of 140°f – or about 5-5 ½ hours.
  11. Rest the roast for 10 minutes on a raised cooling rack.
http://www.charbroil.com/community/bourbon-black-pepper-prime-rib/
Spices for Prime Rib
It is important to use coarse ground black pepper for this, preferably Malabar if you can get it. The sweet smokiness of the bourbon complements the smoky beef.
Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker
The Char-Broil Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker is an easy way to slow roast your prime rib. It has an integrated meat probe thermometer so you will know when to take the roast off.
Smoker Box Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker
I used oak chips because I think it goes well with beef. I also like pecan or a mix of the two. But try others, find out what you like.
Water Pan Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker
Some people ask me about putting flavored liquids into the water pan, like beer or apple juice. I don’t think it hurts anything but I also don’t think it does anything to help, either. If you ask me, I just think it’s a waste of a perfectly good beer.
Spice Rub Prime Rib
I like using extra coarse beef rubs for prime rib because that big hunk of beef can handle a lot of bold flavors. You can use a commercial Montreal seasoning or just some coarse salt, pepper, and dried garlic. Pictured is my current favorite beef rub which is a hybrid of my signature beef rub recipe and Chef Christopher Prieto’s beef rub recipe.
Prime Rib and Spice Rub
I trimmed off the fat cap to expose as much meat as possible to get that delicious crust.
Spiced Prime Rib
Have your butcher partially slice the ribs off. This lets you season the meat under the bones and maximize flavor.
Twined Prime Rib
Roast seasoned and tied back together with butcher’s twine.
Baste for Prime Rib
Whether you strain the baste or not is up to you. I like the slight chunkiness for texture on the crust of the roast.
Prime Rib in Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker
The roast is on the 3rd rack with a half sized steam pan on the 4th rack. Add beef stock to the pan and it will catch the beef drippings, giving you fantastic beef jus.
Roasted Prime Rib after first baste
Just after the first base. For ease of handling I just pull the whole rack out of the smoker. That way I can baste the roast while the smoker stays shut, maintaining its heat.
Prime Rib temperature in Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker
Notice that the probe for the Char-Broil Deluxe Digital Smoker is placed about center mass of the roast. That will give you the most accurate temperature reading.
Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker Display
The “brains” of the Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker makes sure it is smoking at steady temperatures. That’s nice as the days grow shorter, colder, and maybe you don’t want to sit outside tending to a smoker.
Prime Rib perfectly cooked
The baste that was all wet before has now cooked into a flavorful crust.
Prime rib ready to cut
Such a beautiful sight, a prime rib defines “special occasion”.
Prime Rib beautifully displayed
Step 1 – cut off the ribs to make slicing easier. Plus, these are a chef’s treat – what the pitmaster gets to have and doesn’t have to share! Those are beef ribs, delicious tasty beef back ribs. I like to season the cut side with more beef rub and throw it back onto the cooker for another hour or so. They are delightful, steak on a stick!
Black Pepper and Bourbon Prime Rib with au jus
One of my all-time favorite holiday or special occasion meals – beef prime rib au jus.

Southern Honey Glazed Ham

I grew up in the South and a big part of the culture was covered dish suppers for any social event.

  • Church function? Covered dish supper.
  • PTA meeting? Covered dish supper.
  • Holiday party? Covered dish supper.

But you could always count on someone bringing a great Southern style ham – smoky and sweet.

Don’t get me wrong.  I love a savory ham glaze with the typical allspice, nutmeg, and clove flavor profile. But the hams that I remember from those get togethers were all about the sweet.  Think cola glazes and brown sugar crusts.  For my Southern ham, I cook it on my Char-Broil Charcoal Grill 780 with a little pecan wood and then use a glaze using some of the best Southern sweet things – sweet tea, local honey, sweet BBQ rub, and maybe even a smoky sweet shot of bourbon.

Southern Honey Glazed Ham

Honey and Sweet Tea Glazed Ham

Ingredients

  • 8-10 lb bone in, spiral sliced cooked ham
  • For the Glaze
  • ½ cup local honey
  • ½ cup light brown sugar
  • ½ cup sweet tea
  • 1 tablespoon sweet BBQ rub
  • 1 tablespoon coarse grain mustard
  • 1 tablespoon bourbon [optional]
  • 1 tablespoon corn starch
  • 1 tablespoon cold water

Instructions

  1. Preheat your grill to medium heat (300-325°f), set up for indirect heat. For the Charcoal Grill 780, this was done by having coals on the two ends of the charcoal tray and the ham over the empty space between the two ends. Using a “fuse burn” will give you longer cooking times.
  2. Make the glaze. Combine the honey, sugar, tea, BBQ rub, mustard and bourbon (if using) in a small sauce pot and bring to a simmer over low heat on a grill with a side burner (or over medium high on stove top). Simmer until reduced – about 10 minutes.
  3. Thicken the glaze. Make a slurry by whisking together the corn starch and water. Whisk this slurry into the glaze and cook the glaze for another minute. Remove and allow to slightly cool
  4. Place the ham, cut (flat) side down in a half sized steam pan or casserole dish. Drizzle about half of the honey/sweet tea glaze over the ham and brush it on, evenly. Cover tightly with a sheet of aluminum foil.
  5. Cook the ham. Place the ham on the grill over indirect heat, close the grill and let cook for 2 ½ hours.
  6. Glaze and smoke the ham. Pour and brush the rest of honey and sweet tea glaze on the ham. Place two chunks of pecan wood on/near the hot coals and smoke the ham for 10-15 minutes.
  7. Drizzle with any remaining glaze and serve.
http://www.charbroil.com/community/southern-honey-glazed-ham/
Honey Glazed Ham and ingredients
Sweet Southern ingredients! Use local honey – it helps your allergies and supports your local beekeeper.
So this happened...I was making the glaze when this little dude came along, landed on my whisk, and took an interest in what I was making.  He told me that he's an expert on local honey but I've never seen him before so I can't vouch for him.
So this happened…I was making the glaze when this little dude came along, landed on my whisk, and took an interest in what I was making. He told me that he’s an expert on local honey but I’ve never seen him before so I can’t vouch for him.
Gas2Coal and Performance Charcoal 780
I used my Charcoal Grill 780 because the adjustable coal tray and 4 vents provide a lot of options. I used the Gas2Coal just for its side burner for the glaze.
Honey Glazed Ham on Grill
Here’s the set up for this specific grill. I have the tray fully lowered and the coals banked to the sides so the ham isn’t cooking directly over the heat. Also notice the fuse burn – that provides extended cooking times. More about that in a minute.
Honey Glazed Ham cooking over coals
Place the ham flat side down in a half sized steam pan and then brush with half of the glaze.
Charcoal for Honey Glazed Ham recipe
So the “fuse burn” is just what it implies. You put un-lit briquettes on your charcoal tray and then place live coals at one end. As those burn, they catch the neighboring coals on fire and it burns like a fuse – maintaining heat. For this cook, I used about 20 unlit coals on each end and pushed them back (but make sure the tray holes are clear). Then I started a chimney of coal and dumped half on the front of each side like this.
Char-Broil Charcoal Performance 780
I target 300-325°f. I like that every Char-Broil grill that I have has a quality temperature gauge so I don’t have to guess as to what “medium hot” is.
Glazing Honey Glazed Ham
The second round of glaze is going to give you another layer of flavor and the glossy sheen.
Smoldering Wood in Charcoal Performance 780
For Southern hams, I like to use pecan or hickory because back in the day, people smoked with the woods in their region. Hickory and pecan are all over the South. Put the wood chunks (not soaked) over the hot coals to get it started while you are glazing the ham. Then move it to near the coals to let it smolder.
Glazed Ham over coals
The glaze will also capture the fresh smoke. The hams were smoked when originally cooked, this is just a quick fresh kiss of smoke. Think of the glaze as lip gloss. It helps the smoke stick to the ham. I picked this trick up from one of the top competitive BBQ teams a few years ago.
Southern Ham
Smoky and sweet, just like a Southern ham should be.
Southern Honey Glazed Ham
Just looking at this picture makes me want to grab a dinner roll and make a sandwich.

Smoked Leg of Lamb Roulade with Apple-Cranberry Sourdough Stuffing

This prime-grade leg of Colorado Lamb has been brined in seasonal spices, butterflied and thoroughly trimmed, lined with a finely cured prosciutto, filled with a tart apple-cranberry sourdough stuffing, then rolled, tied and slowly smoked to tender, medium-rare perfection. Paired with a gorgeous full-bodied red wine and a winter white kale and arugula salad with pear, pomegranate, and a date honey balsamic vinaigrette.

Cheers and bon appetit! -David

Smoked Leg of Lamb Roulade with Apple-Cranberry Sourdough Stuffing

Ingredients

    For the Brine
  • 1 gallon cool water
  • 1 cup kosher salt
  • 3/4 cups granulated sugar
  • Fresh sprigs of rosemary and thyme
  • 2 tablespoon peppercorns
  • 1 tablespoon cumin seeds
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • For the Leg of Lamb
  • 4 cups homemade sourdough stuffing, fully prepared – or click HERE for easy to follow recipe
  • 1 (4-5 pound) boneless leg of American Lamb, thoroughly trimmed and butterflied
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus additional for basting
  • 2 tablespoons freshly grated orange zest
  • 2 tablespoon garlic powder
  • Kosher salt and coarsely ground black peppercorn, to taste
  • 16oz prosciutto, finely sliced
  • You will need
  • • 6-8 12” strands of kitchen string
  • • 4 cups red oak wood chips, or hickory wood chips

Instructions

  1. In a large stock pot bring water, salt and sugar to a boil. Once rolling boil achieved, remove from burner, toss in a few handfuls of herbs, peppercorn and cinnamon sticks. Allow the water to cool entirely (to room temperature), then immerse the leg of lamb, cover and refrigerate for 8-24 hours. Afterwards, remove meat from the brine, discard brine water, rinse lamb off under the faucet and pat dry with paper towel. Set aside and allow meat to return near room temperature.
  2. Meanwhile, prepare homemade sourdough stuffing. Set aside.
  3. 1 hour prior to smoking, butterfly and thoroughly trim the lamb, removing as much of the tough, gamey fat as possible. Drizzle the meat with olive oil and massage a liberal degree of seasonings, zest, salt and ground peppercorn into all portions of the lamb. With fat cap down, spread prosciutto across the bone-side portion of the meat. Spoon an even layer of stuffing across the prosciutto-lined butterflied- lamb leg. Then roll the lamb tightly upon itself in jelly-roll fashion. Wrap with kitchen string and truss in 2-inch intervals. Set aside.
  4. 20-30 minutes prior to smoking, load smoker with wood chips, fill the water pan and preheat to 225F. Place the wrapped leg of lamb across the middle rack of the smoker – fat cap up. Slowly roast for 90 minutes - 2 hours, lightly basting every 20 minutes with olive oil, or until the internal temperature of the roll achieves 130F and juices run clear.
  5. To finish, sear the exterior of the rolled lamb over a well-oiled super-heated cast iron pan, or the hottest direct heat grill grates of your Char-Broil TRU Infrared Grill. Char the lamb roll exterior at 1-2 minutes per quarter turn, searing for 4-8 minutes total.
  6. Carefully transfer lamb to a cutting board. Tent with tin foil and rest for 10 minutes before removing the kitchen string, slicing across the grain into thing medallions, and plating. Season additionally to taste, and serve.
http://www.charbroil.com/community/smoked-leg-lamb-roulade-apple-cranberry-sourdough-stuffing/

smoked leg of lamb roulade with apple-cranberry sourdough stuffing

Herb-Encrusted and Smoked Cornish Hen

The American Rock Hen, otherwise known as “Game Hen” or “Cornish Hen,” is an exotic domestic bird, originally crossbred in the far northeast farmlands of Connecticut during the mid-1950’s. These fine feathered fowl are often mistaken as “wild game” or young chickens, but are a distinct farm-raised breed and unique for three reasons – 1. The breast meat is incrementally greater in volume as compared to similar-sized broiler chickens, 2. In 5 weeks these birds will attain adult weight (between 2-3 pounds) and fully prepared for harvest nearly 2 weeks sooner than their broiler chicken counterparts, and 3. their sweet, succulent meat demands a premium in price per pound.

Less than 30 years ago, these birds were considered an American delicacy, served only upon special occasion, but today can be found in farmer’s markets from coast to coast. These birds are not only phenomenal in flavor due to their grass and grain diet, but a perfect single-serving substitution for turkey, chicken, pheasant or duck.

Prepared and served whole, the smoked Cornish Hen recipe below provides the step-by-step guide and best practices to brining, seasoning, smoking and basting Cornish Rock Hen to tender, juicy, mouthwatering perfection.

Herb-Encrusted and Smoked Cornish Hens with Southern Cornbread Stuffing

Ingredients

  • 16 cups water
  • 2 12oz cans of beer (or non-alcoholic beer)
  • 2 cup kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 cups brown sugar
  • Fresh sprigs of rosemary, sage and thyme, plus additional for stuffing and garnish
  • 6 1-2 pound whole Cornish hens, thawed, trimmed and giblets removed
  • 1 stick of cold butter, sliced into 12 equal parts
  • Olive oil, plus additional for basting
  • 1 cup Italian seasoning
  • 3 tablespoon garlic powder
  • Kosher salt and fresh ground black peppercorn, to taste
  • Zest of 3 small lemons, lemons then quartered
  • Cornbread stuffing, fully prepared
  • 4 cups apple wood, or your favorite alternate hardwood

Instructions

  1. In a large pot bring water, salt and sugar to a boil. Once rolling boil achieved, remove from burner, toss in a few handfuls of herbs, and allow the water to cool entirely (to room temperature). Pour in 2 cans of beer, immerse hens, cover and refrigerate for 8-24 hours.
  2. Remove hens from brine, rinse under cold water and pat dry with paper towel. Discard brine. Place hens back in the refrigerator for 1 hour, uncovered, to further dry and tighten the skin.
  3. 45 minutes prior to smoking, remove birds from refrigerator to begin returning to room temperature. Gently slide a finger between the breast meat and adjoining skin, then slide a slab of cold butter under the loosened skin – 2 slabs of butter per hen, 1 over each breast.
  4. Drizzle the hens with olive oil inside and out, then massage a liberal degree of Italian seasoning, garlic powder, salt, peppercorn, and 1/6 of the lemon zest into all portions of each bird. Stuff posterior of the bird with prepared cornbread stuffing. Insert a quartered lemon and small handful of fresh herb sprigs into the upper end of the hen’s cavity.
  5. 20-30 minutes prior to smoking, load smoker with wood chips, fill the water pan and preheat to 275F.
  6. Place the hens evenly across the smoker racks – balancing the bird upon it’s backbone. Slowly roast for 2 hours, lightly basting every 30 minutes with olive oil, or until the internal temperature of the dark thigh meat reaches 165F and juices run clear.
  7. Carefully remove hens from the smoker and transfer to a cutting board. Tent with tin foil and rest for 10 minutes before discarding the lemon and herbs.
  8. Carve, season additionally to taste, and serve.
http://www.charbroil.com/community/herb-encrusted-smoked-cornish-hen/

herb-encrusted and smoked cornish hen

Gorgonzola and Black Pepper Burger

Burgers get kind of crazy these days. Sports bars and gastropubs pile so much stuff on them that they have to stab a knife through them to keep them upright and you’d have to be able to unhinge your jaw to bite into some of these towering burgers.  Or the “Jucy Lucy” (aka Juicy Lucy) trend where so much cheese and stuff is crammed into the burger, you don’t even notice the burger itself.

This afternoon, I wanted a simple but quality burger so I challenged myself to create a great burger with only a handful of ingredients and without a trip to the store.  Fortunately, we’ve been cooking a lot this week and there was a lot in the house to choose from. This is what I came up with…

Gorgonzola and Black Pepper Burgers

These are a grown-up style “Jucy Lucy” – just a little cheese in there to let you know it’s there but there’s no cheese dripping off of your chin and the beef is still the focus, not the toppings.  Gorgonzola and black pepper stuffed burgers with baby spinach and red onions.  Simple, right?  Simply delicious, too!

Gorgonzola and Black Pepper Burgers

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ pounds fresh ground chuck
  • ¼ to ½ cup crumbled gorgonzola cheese
  • 1 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper
  • Finishing salt, to taste
  • 4 brioche or hamburger buns
  • 1 cup fresh baby spinach leaves
  • ½ red onion, peeled and thinly sliced

Instructions

  1. Evenly divide meat into 8 balls. It is best to do this by weight, 3 ounces each. Using the Char-Broil Cast Aluminum Burger Press, form the balls into 8 thin patties.
  2. Top 4 patties each with one fourth of crumbled gorgonzola in the middle of each patty and then spread one fourth of the black pepper on each patty from edge to edge.
  3. Cap each of the 4 loaded patties with the other four patties. Pinch and knead the edges until sealed and formed back into a square edge. If you have the time, place in refrigeration for 45 minutes before grilling.
  4. Preheat your grill to medium high heat (450°f)
  5. Grill the burgers for 4 minutes on each side (give it a quarter turn at 2 minutes if you want cross hatch marks). As always, use your digital thermometer and if you didn’t grind your own beef, cook them to USDA food safe temps.
  6. As soon as the burgers come off, hit them with your finishing salt. [see notes]
  7. Toast your buns! It always makes your burger better, if you ask me.
  8. Serve on toasted buns with baby spinach and thin sliced red onion.
http://www.charbroil.com/community/gorgonzola-black-pepper-burger/

Notes

Burger Press
To make stuffed burgers, you want patties of even thickness and size. That starts with using a Char-Broil Cast Aluminum Burger Press. [FTC Disclaimer: I received my press as part of my sponsorship package, free of charge.]
Gorgonzola and Black Pepper Burgers in Burger Press
One tip: When using a burger press, use wax sheets to make it easier to remove and stack the patties as you make them. Make sure to keep the meat as cold as possible.
Making Burgers
For the most even burgers, weigh it out. For a single patty burger, I go with 5.3 ounces (1/3 pound). For a double, I use 4 ounce patties. For Jucy Lucy burgers, I use a pair of 3 ounce patties.
Using a burger press
Don’t be shy. Really crank down to press the meat out flat.
Burger press methods
The advantage to a burger press is that you get patties with consistent size and thickness. That’s a secret to cooking – it’s easier to cook when everything is the same size. That’s why chefs go nuts learning do dice, brunoise, and batonnet to exact standards. Same thing goes for your back yard.
Making gorgonzola and black pepper burgers
Keep the cheese away from the edges so you can seal the edges more easily.
Burger press burgers
The burger press makes consistent burgers like this, easy.
Cooking gorgonzola and black pepper burgers
Immediately after flipping, which is when you often see flare ups on some grills because grease hits the coals and ignites. But here you only see a little smoke, because the Char-Broil Gas2Coal uses a special coal tray that maximizes efficiency and minimizes fires.
Finished Gorgonzola and Black Pepper Burgers
You need to hit the burgers with the finishing salt as soon as they come off, while they are juicy and will grab the salt. The finishing salt can be as easy as fine sea salt. Here I’m using fine pink Himalayan salt with black pepper.
Gorgonzola and Black Pepper Burgers, ready to eat
Another good thing about using a burger press is that it gives you a burger that fits the bun. It doesn’t take 25 ingredients to make a great burger, just quality ingredients.
Gorgonzola and Black Pepper Burger in hand
Now that’s a burger!

Rotisserie Roasted Red Wine & Herb Leg of Lamb

Roasted leg of lamb is a real show stopper for special occasions and festive meals.  Rotisserie roasting a leg of lamb over hot coals makes it even better because as the fat renders, it continuously bastes the roast.  Plus, it shows off your grilling flair!

Buying A Leg of Lamb

Buying lamb can be intimidating since it’s not something that most people in the United States buy all the time.  Here are some tips to take the pressure off you.Making the Grade: Like beef, in the United States, all lamb is   But grading is voluntary so the lamb you see may or may not have a grade.  If it has a grade, Prime is the best, followed by Choice, and then Select.

  • Home Grown or Down Under: The two primary options for grocery store shoppers are either New Zealand/Australian lamb or domestic. Lamb from New Zealand is typically grass fed.  Domestic lamb is grain fed and usually larger in size. If you like the edgy taste of lamb, go for the New Zealand lamb.  If you like it tamer and less gamey, go for domestic.
  • How Does It Look? If your lamb is not graded, that’s okay. Look for light red meat and the fat should be firm and white.  Darker meat and yellow fat indicate an older animal and/or oxidation. It’s okay to see red “blood” in bones, that means it’s a younger animal as this disappears from the marrow in older animals.
  • A Bone to Pick: Leg of lamb can be found with the bone in, semi-boneless, or boneless.  Since we are putting this bad boy on a rotisserie rod, you want the boneless leg of lamb.  These often come in an elastic net to hold the shape of the roast.
  • Mary had a little lamb…how much do the rest of my guests need? Allow about ½ pound, pre-cooked weight, per guest.  I find it is better to do multiple smaller roasts to accommodate quantities rather than one big one.  Smaller ones are usually more tender and cook quicker.

Once you have your perfect leg of lamb, you want a highly seasoned plan of attack.  This recipe uses red wine, garlic, and herbs for a boldly flavored paste to match the rich flavor of lamb. A little coriander and lemon juice brighten those flavors, making this leg of lamb worthy of any special dinner.

Herb Leg of Lamb

Rotisserie Roasted Red Wine & Herb Leg of Lamb

Ingredients

  • 2.5 to 3.5-pound boneless lamb of leg
  • For the paste
  • ¼ cup quality olive oil
  • ¼ cup flat leaf parsley
  • ¼ cup fresh oregano
  • ¼ cup red wine
  • 2 tablespoons garlic paste or 6 cloves finely minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon ground coriander
  • For the tzatziki sauce
  • 2 cups Greek yogurt
  • ½ cup seeded, peeled, and minced cucumber
  • 1 tablespoon garlic past or 3 cloves finely minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1.5 teaspoons fresh dill weed
  • Kosher salt to taste, about 1 teaspoon

Instructions

  1. Place all ingredients in a blender or food processor and blend until combined into a thin paste.
  2. Use half of the paste and cover the leg of lamb, making sure to get into all the nooks and crannies. See notes for options of how to do this. Allow to rest at room temperature for 1-2 hours. Reserve the rest of the paste for later.
  3. Mix the tzatziki sauce ingredients together and refrigerate for 1 hour before serving
  4. Preheat your grill to medium-high heat with an indirect set up so the hot coals or lit burners are not directly below where your meat will be.
  5. Spear the rotisserie rod through the leg of lamb lengthwise, trying to keep it as dead center as possible. Place on the grill and adjust the rotisserie tines to secure the meat tightly over the gap between the hot coals or lit burners. Close the lid and allow the roast to cook for 30 minutes.
  6. Baste the meat with the remaining red wine and herb paste. Continue cooking until the roast reaches an internal temperature of 135°f for medium rare. This should take anywhere from 20 more minutes (50 minutes total) for smaller roasts to 45 more minutes (1 hour 15 minutes total) for heftier roasts.
  7. Allow the meat to rest on a raised cooking rack for 5 minutes. Slice and serve with the tzatziki sauce.
http://www.charbroil.com/community/rotisserie-roasted-red-wine-herb-leg-of-lamb/
For this cook, I used my Gas2Coal hybrid grill with the Char-Broil Universal Rotisserie accessory. The Gas2Coal becomes even more convenient during the colder weather. It’s nice to fire it up with the ease of gas and come back out in 10 minutes to cook over hot coals.
For this cook, I used my Gas2Coal hybrid grill with the Char-Broil Universal Rotisserie accessory. The Gas2Coal becomes even more convenient during the colder weather. It’s nice to fire it up with the ease of gas and come back out in 10 minutes to cook over hot coals.
Gas2Coal and Rotiserrie
Installation was relatively easy and I got it done in about 10 minutes while the lamb was marinating. I could probably have done it in 5 minutes if I bothered to read the instructions.
Leg of Lamb
Lamb has strong flavor so you want to match that with richly flavored ingredients.
Leg of Lamb Red Wine and Herb Paste
The red wine and herb paste is admittedly very green but don’t worry. It will cook on to the roast with a typical brown crust.
Marinated Leg of Lamb
For maximum flavor, I prefer to take the roast out of the netting to slather the paste all over it and then roll it back up. You can either re-use the netting or tie it with butcher’s twine.
Wrapped Leg of Lamb
But we have also tested this leaving the leg in the netting and it still worked well, so you don’t HAVE to take it out.
Gas2Coal Charcoal
Example of my typical rotisserie set up. You don’t won’t the rendered fat to drip directly on coals below or it can cause a grease fire and burn your meat. Note that this is just for a visual example. When starting the coals on the Gas2Coal, place the coals in their usual place and once ready, shift them to this arrangement.
Leg of Lamb Rotisserie
Tip: Your leg of lamb will shrink a little while cooking so when you secure the meat tines on the rotisserie, push in a little to compact the meat. Otherwise it might start wiggling loose during the cooking.
Leg of Lamb cooking
You can leave the lid open while using a rotisserie but it will take more than twice as long to cook so I like to go “lid down”. Universal kits like this “fit most” but aren’t perfect on every grill. Check how yours operated BEFORE it’s all loaded up and hot. I noticed mine was binding a little bit, hindering the free rotation of the rotisserie. Rather than risking the roast sticking in one position, I just propped the lid like this and it worked great.
Leg of Lamb over coals
A side benefit to the Gas2Coal charcoal tray is that when the juices drip on to the metal tray, they vaporize and help flavor the meat.
Roasting Leg of Lamb
The second roast that we tested was much bigger and took longer, so I had to add some coal. I just pushed the existing briquettes in and filled behind them with lump coal, like Char-Broil’s Center Cut Lump Coal. Lump coal starts up easier from the existing coals and burns cleaner, without any funny off tastes.
Rotisserie Leg of Lamb
Like most roasts, resting the meat after cooking lets the meat finishing cooking and helps to evenly distribute the juices.
Roasted Leg of Lamb ready to eat
Young lamb is best served medium rare. This gives the maximum tenderness and rich taste.

Of course, I never recommend buying specific grilling equipment for just one dish. Some other things I like cooking on the Char-Broil Universal Rotisserie are:

  • a highly seasoned beef eye of round cooked to medium rare and sliced thinly
  • a boneless pork loin crusted with a coarse rub
  • a boneless turkey breast basted with honey, wine and stock.

Hickory Smoked Turkey with Honey Bourbon Glaze

A well smoked, juicy turkey is a beautiful thing and can be the cornerstone of a memorable family meal.  There are a few tricks you can do to ensure that bird is always juicy.

Cook by Temperature not Time 

Cooking times and temps (e.g. cook for 5 hours at 275°F) are just estimates.  Your best bet for a juicy bird is using a remote probe thermometer and cooking the turkey until it registers an internal temperature of 157-160°F in the breast.

Pre-Treat the Turkey

Pretreating the turkey will add moisture, help retain moisture, and/or add flavor.  Pretreating can be marinades, dry brines, wet brines, or injections.  Marinades add flavor but don’t penetrate much.  Dry and wet brines work well but take extra time.  For this recipe, we use a sweet, buttery injection with the smokiness of bourbon.

Baste/Mop/Spritz the Turkey 

Adding moisture and flavor to the turkey while it cooks helps too.  You can baste or mop the turkey with a flavorful liquid.  You can spritz it with things like spray “butter” (butter substitutes) or light colored fruit juices that complement the flavor profile you are using.  In this recipe, we break out a sweet and smoky compound butter.  It bastes and flavors the turkey as it cooks.  An extra benefit of compound butter over basting, mopping, or spritzing is that you don’t have to keep opening your smoker.  Frequently opening your cooker to baste/mop/spritz keeps letting your heat out and extends your cooking time every time you open it.

I cooked this recipe on a Char-Broil Deluxe Digital Smoker that I received as part of a compensation package from Char-Broil to work with their team.  I have to admit that I chose to use it out of all of my many other smokers and grills because I was lazy.  I was very busy doing other things and the Deluxe Digital Smoker is as easy and “hands off” as you can get.  This recipe will work on other Char-Broil grill and smokers as well.

Hickory Smoked Turkey with Honey Bourbon Glaze

Ingredients

  • 9 – 11 pound young turkey, thawed if frozen
  • For the injection
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1/2 ounce bourbon
  • For the compound butter
  • 2 sticks unsalted butter, left at room temperature for 1 hour
  • ¼ cup turbinado sugar (can substitute light brown sugar)
  • 1 ounce bourbon
  • For the seasoning
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon coarse black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon granulated garlic
  • 1 teaspoon dried parsley
  • 1 teaspoon turbinado sugar (can substitute light brown sugar)
  • 1 teaspoon dried lemon peel
  • For the honey bourbon glaze
  • ½ cup honey
  • ¼ cup chicken stock
  • 1 ounce bourbon
  • You’ll also need
  • Meat injector/syringe like the Char-Broil Marinade Injector
  • 3 cups Hickory wood chips

Instructions

  1. Make the compound butter. Mash the butter, turbinado, and bourbon together in a medium bowl until they are well mixed together. Place in refrigeration until ready to use. Can be made a day or two ahead of time, just take it out about an hour before using it to let it soften.
  2. Make the injection. Mix the injection ingredients together in a small pot over your grill’s side burner or stove top over medium high heat. Bring to a simmer and then whisk until all of the ingredients are melted and combined, about 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool for 30 minutes before using.
  3. Make the seasoning. Mix together the seasoning ingredients in a shallow bowl and set aside.
  4. Preheat your cooker to 275°f. For the Char-Broil Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker, that’s easy. You just load the chip bin with hickory wood chips, put water in the water pan, and turn the unit on to preheat mode.
  5. Prepare the turkey. To spatchcock the turkey, place it breast side down and cut up each side of the spine with a pair of poultry sheers. Discard the spine or use it for making stock. Flip the turkey over and press down firmly on the breast bone to flatten the turkey. You should hear the rib bones crack. (See instructional pictures below.)
  6. Inject the turkey. Inject 2-3 tablespoons (30-35ml), or about one syringe full, into each breast. Inject 1-1.5 tablespoons (15-27.5ml) into each leg, thigh, and wing.
  7. Season the turkey. Work a finger between the skin and meat to create openings by the thighs and breasts (see instructional pictures below). Work the compound butter into the openings and spread it around under the skin. For any remaining butter, slather it on top of the skin. Season the turkey, front and back, with the dry rub.
  8. Smoke the turkey. Once the smoker is preheated to 275°f and you can see occasional wisps of smoke, place the turkey, skin side up, on a rack in the smoker. Smoke until the internal temperature reaches 155°f, about 30-35 minutes per pound.
  9. Glaze the turkey. Drizzle half of the glaze on the turkey and return the bird to the smoker until it reaches an internal temperature of 160°f.
  10. Rest and serve the turkey. Remove the turkey from the smoker, drizzle the remaining glaze onto the turkey and let the turkey rest for 10 minutes. Carve, slice, and serve!
http://www.charbroil.com/community/hickory-smoked-turkey-honey-bourbon-glaze/

Notes

  1. Tubrinado sugar (aka raw sugar) is a less processed type of sugar that doesn’t burn as easily as white or brown sugar, so it’s useful for grilling and smoking.  Most grocery stores carry it now but you can substitute light brown sugar if necessary.
Spatchcocking is much easier than it looks if you have a good pair of poultry shears. You’re just cutting two straight lines.
Spatchcocking is much easier than it looks if you have a good pair of poultry shears. You’re just cutting two straight lines.
When you press down on the chest bone, do it with a lot of force, you are trying to break the ribs. I find that using a CPR style two handed approach works best.
When you press down on the chest bone, do it with a lot of force, you are trying to break the ribs. I find that using a CPR style two handed approach works best.
Tucking the wings back like this helps them cook more evenly and it exposes more of the breast to smoke and heat.
Tucking the wings back like this helps them cook more evenly and it exposes more of the breast to smoke and heat.
Now that you have prepped the bird, let's get into layers of seasoning.
Now that you have prepped the bird, let’s get into layers of seasoning.
The injection adds sweet and smoky flavors, as well as moisture to help ensure a juicy bird.
The injection adds sweet and smoky flavors, as well as moisture to help ensure a juicy bird.
The compound butter lays down another round of flavor. Once you have established an opening, use two fingers to insert the butter under the skin. Then distribute it around by massaging it from above the skin.
The compound butter lays down another round of flavor. Once you have established an opening, use two fingers to insert the butter under the skin. Then distribute it around by massaging it from above the skin.
Getting the butter under the thigh skin works the same way.
Getting the butter under the thigh skin works the same way.
The seasoning is basic but very effective in enhancing the flavor of the bird. The dried lemon peel brightens the flavor.
The seasoning is basic but very effective in enhancing the flavor of the bird. The dried lemon peel brightens the flavor.
I pick up the turkey to make it easier to get the hard to reach areas like under the wings and legs.
Don't forget to season the back of the wings, legs, and body cavity.
Don’t forget to season the back of the wings, legs, and body cavity.
Tying the legs together helps hold the turkey together so the legs protect the thin part of the breast and it fits better on the Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker rack better.
Tying the legs together helps hold the turkey together so the legs protect the thin part of the breast and it fits better on the Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker rack better.
Trimmed, injected, buttered, seasoned, and tied.
Trimmed, injected, buttered, seasoned, and tied.
The same recipe works with a 5-7 pound bone in turkey breast. Cut out the backbone.
The same recipe works with a 5-7 pound bone in turkey breast. Cut out the backbone.
Turn the breast over and firmly press down to crack it open.
Turn the breast over and firmly press down to crack it open.
Inject the same amount (30-45 ml) in each side of the breast.
Inject the same amount (30-45 ml) in each side of the breast.
Season all over. You'll use less rub of course, about 1/3 cup total.
Season all over. You’ll use less rub of course, about 1/3 cup total.
Fully prepped 11 lb turkey and a 6 lb breast. Next stop, smoke town via the easy to use Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker.
Fully prepped 11 lb turkey and a 6 lb breast. Next stop, smoke town via the easy to use Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker.
Tip: Prepare your turkeys on the removable racks from the smoker. That makes it easy to load in and out of the smoker. Just remember to wear heat resistant gloves when taking them back out.
Tip: Prepare your turkeys on the removable racks from the smoker. That makes it easy to load in and out of the smoker. Just remember to wear heat resistant gloves when taking them back out.
Many beginners make the mistake of thinking that they need a thick white smoke, but that just means your wood is burning poorly and it will make your food taste like soot. Once preheated, your smoke coming out of the vents should be in thin wisps of light colored smoke. Fortunately, the line of Digital Electric Smokers from Char-Broil is engineered to take care of that for you so you don’t have to worry about it.
Many beginners make the mistake of thinking that they need a thick white smoke, but that just means your wood is burning poorly and it will make your food taste like soot. Once preheated, your smoke coming out of the vents should be in thin wisps of light colored smoke. Fortunately, the line of Digital Electric Smokers from Char-Broil is engineered to take care of that for you so you don’t have to worry about it.
Tip: If cooking on multiple levels, you might want to put a drip barrier between the two turkeys so the top one doesn't drip on the bottom one. In Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker, you can easily handle two 9-11 pound turkeys or 4 bone in turkey breasts or a mix thereof.
Tip: If cooking on multiple levels, you might want to put a drip barrier between the two turkeys so the top one doesn’t drip on the bottom one. In the Deluxe Digital Electric Smoker, you can easily handle two 9-11 pound turkeys or 4 bone-in turkey breasts or a mix thereof.
Checking the appearance of the breast at 2 1/2 hours into the cook. In general for cooking poultry, if the skin starts to appear to dry out, you can spritz it with spray "butter" or a light colored fruit juice. Since we used a ton of butter under and on the skin with this recipe, that really isn’t an issue here. (Note, it was not cooking at 75 degrees, it was cooking at 275f. LCD displays like this aren’t actually solid lights, they rapidly flash, tricking the human eye but fast shutter speeds, the camera will catch it.)
Checking the appearance of the breast at 2 1/2 hours into the cook. In general for cooking poultry, if the skin starts to appear to dry out, you can spritz it with spray “butter” or a light-colored fruit juice. Since we used a ton of butter under and on the skin with this recipe, that really isn’t an issue here. (Note, it was not cooking at 75 degrees, it was cooking at 275F. LCD displays like this aren’t actually solid lights, they rapidly flash, tricking the human eye but fast shutter speeds, the camera will catch it.)
Ready to serve! I also prefer a spatchcocked turkey because of the way it looks on a platter - a side benefit besides the quicker and more even cooking. Confession – I forgot to glaze this one until later. I got busy working on something else. It was still pretty, though.
Ready to serve! I also prefer a spatchcocked turkey because of the way it looks on a platter – a side benefit besides the quicker and more even cooking. Confession – I forgot to glaze this one until later. I got busy working on something else. It was still pretty, though.
Turkey breast ready to slice. The turkey breast is great for small families, families that prefer white meat, or when you need just a little extra turkey.
Turkey breast ready to slice. The turkey breast is great for small families, families that prefer white meat, or when you need just a little extra turkey.
Instead of carving the breast top down in slices like the traditional way, I prefer to cut off each lobe of the breast. I slice down as deep and as close to the sternum (center breast bone) as possible. Then slice in from the side bottom towards the sternum.
Instead of carving the breast top down in slices like the traditional way, I prefer to cut off each lobe of the breast. I slice down as deep and as close to the sternum (center breast bone) as possible. Then slice in from the side bottom towards the sternum.
This frees the lobe from the breast like this. Use a fork or fingers to pick out any meat that got left behind on the breast. Now you will be slicing the breast against the grain instead of with it, giving a more tender slice.
This frees the lobe from the breast like this. Use a fork or fingers to pick out any meat that got left behind on the breast. Now you will be slicing the breast against the grain instead of with it, giving a more tender slice.
Even after smoking for hours, the turkey was juicy as can be when sliced.
Even after smoking for hours, the turkey was juicy as can be when sliced.

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